News

Penning COVID-19

covid containment

One of two restricted-use areas proposed in Dillingham

UPDATE: This is an update version of an earlier story.

With almost 64,000 Americans now reported dead as a result of the corona-virus COVID-19 and the communities surrounding Alaska’s salmon-rich Bristol Bay yet untouched by the disease, the Dillingham City Council was Thursday night considering sweeping restrictions on fishermen and salmon processors in one of the state’s most important ports.

In the end – with the area residents sounding split on whether regulations should favor economic health or maximize individual protection from the pandemic – city leaders compromised, abandoned proposed restraints on fish processors, and voted to use the local airport as a choke point to try to keep COVID-19 out of the community 330 miles southwest of Anchorage.

The airport is the main means of access to the remote area hundreds of miles from the state road system.

Dillingham, population 2,300, is the focal point of the Bay that fisheries consultant Andy Wink describes as “home to the most valuable wild salmon fishery in the world (where) each year, a fleet of roughly 2,350 small vessels hand-pick more than 25 million salmon from nets during a brief summer season. In a state known for salmon, the Bristol Bay fishery accounts for 41 percent of total salmon permit value and is truly the crown jewel of the state’s commercial salmon fishing portfolio.”

Dillingham Mayor Alice Ruby and the Curyung Tribal Council early in the month asked Gov. Mike Dunleavy to close the Bay to the more than 10,000 processing workers and commercial fishermen from the lower-48 who flood into the area in June and July to harvest all those salmon. Dunleavy refused, saying commercial fishing is an essential state industry.

Commercial fishing is the state’s second-largest employer, and a key part – in some cases the main part – of the economies in some rural communities.

The state did impose protective measures on the operations of commercial fishing boats and ordered processors to come with COVID-19 safety plans before opening their salmon plants this year.

The emergency order before the Dillingham Council Thursday night aimed to expand on those restrictions by creating the essential air travel district and “establishing a temporary land use district called the “Fisheries Related Use District,” and then limiting uses in both of those areas.

Some local complained the ordinance as written would punish local residents as much as the thousands of commercial fishermen and seafood processing workers about to descend on Dillingham from the around the world.

Others argued that if the city set up a thorough testing and quarantine program, it might be able to get through the short, summer fishing season largely untouched by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

City Mananger Tod Larson said that ideally a protection plan would include two tests and a quarantine period with the first test coming before people get on a plane to Dillingham and the other being conducted in the city.

He critized the state health mandate for it’s lack of a testing requirement. The current tests, however, are far from perfect.

“There currently is no gold-standard diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2 since the virus is new to us,” the American Society for Microbiology reported just days ago. “As yet, there is no consensus on how accurate our testing is, and given the potential for asymptomatic carriage and prolonged viral shedding post-infection, we likely have a long road ahead and many lessons to learn. But understanding the limitations and pitfalls of our testing is incredibly important for both serving the public and patients. No test is perfect, and we are all learning together on this one.”

Fourteen-day wait

With the city’s creation of the essential travel zone, people flying into Dillingham will be required to obtain a “travel-use permit,” self-quarantine for 14 days, and wear masks.

“As of the date of this Emergency Ordinance there are no known cases of Covid19 in Dillingham,” the ordinance said. “As of Sunday April 26 there had been 152 confirmed cases of Covid-19 in Anchorage.

“The most effective way to prevent introduction of the Covid-19 virus to Dillingham is through prevention of persons from outside Dillingham who are infected with Covid-19 from entering Dillingham through the Dillingham Airport terminal and Dillingham port and harbor facilities.

“The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) and federal and state health authorities have recommended all persons practice ‘social distancing’ by remaining at least a six-foot separation from other persons at all times and it is frequently not possible to maintain a six-foot separation from other persons when using commercial air services between Dillingham and Anchorage or Dillingham and other cities in the Bristol Bay region due to the small size of the aircraft used to provide air transportation.”

Given these problems, the ordinance argues, it is impossible for the community to keep the pandemic virus SARS-CoV-2 at bay without stiff restrictions on travel and workplace operations. The virus has rippled through other food processing plants across the nation and around the world.

Lerøy, a major salmon farmer in Norway, joined the list of COVID-hit businesses at midmonth.  The website Fish Farming Expert reported outbreaks at two Lerøy plants. The company reported 20 up to possibly 150 people affected.

The Indianapolis Star on Saturday reported the Tyson Fresh Meats plant in Logansport, Ind., was shutting down with almost 150 employees infected. The Hill reported Thursday that the number had grown to almost 900 at the pork processing plant.

Invasion

Such news is scary in Dillingham where the ordinance anticipates “”that as many as 10,000 people from outside Dillingham will enter city boundaries via the airport or by water after May 1 and remain in the Dillingham area through the conclusion of the commercial and sport fishing seasons. These individuals will come from within Alaska, from other states on the west coast of the United States and from other countries where large numbers of confirmed cases of the COVID-19 virus have been reported.

“As of April 26, the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 infections in Oregon, Washington and California was: California – 43,691 Oregon – 2,311 Washington – 13,663
Because so many of those engaged in the commercial fishing industry come from outside Alaska and are not permanent Dillingham residents the existing data as to the rate of infection, per capita testing, and rate of hospitalization within Alaska is of limited use in gauging the risk of overwhelming local medical facilities during the 2020 commercial fishing season.”

The local hospital has only 12 beds and almost no critical-care capacity. The hospital has no ventilator, a potential life-saving device that can boost the odds of survival for those with severely damaged lungs.

Though the survival rate for those who end up on ventilators is poor, ventilators– like face masks – have become a topic of much discussion and media attention as the medical community battles the respiratory problems caused by SARS – Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. 

The CDC has now recommended face masks although some doctors have raised questions about how they are used by the public. Studies have shown bacteria and viruses accumulate in masks, especially when they are worn for lengthy periods of time.

National Jewish Health, a world leader in lung treatment and research, notes people should wash their hands thoroughly before putting on a mask, place it around their nose and mouth without touching the face of the mask, wash their hands before taking off the mask, remove the mask without touching the part touching your face, throw the mask in the trash, and again wash your hands thoroughly.

“If you are using a reusable cloth mask,,” National Jewish adds, “take the mask off from the straps (not touching the front), place in a pillowcase to keep the ties with the mask. Wash it in the washing machine with hot water and completely dry on medium or high heat.”

In part due to the danger of contact transmission from people who improperly remove masks and then touch things, the CDC is now also recommending that people gassing their cars and trucks “use disinfecting wipes on handles and buttons before you touch them,” and “after fueling, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol. Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when you get home or somewhere with soap and water.”

The insidious and potentially deadly nature of COVID-19 has left many in the country and possibly nowhere more so than in rural, coastal Alaska where the Spanish Flu devasted some villages a century ago.

The full text of the emergency resolution follows:

Dillingham emergency ordinance

CITY OF DILLINGHAM, ALASKA

EMERGENCY ORDINANCE NO. 2020-07 AN EMERGENCY ORDINANCE OF THE DILLINGHAM CITY COUNCIL; 1) MODIFYING AND RENAMING A TEMPORARY LAND USE DISTRICT FORMERLY CALLED THE ESSENTIAL AIR TRAVEL DISTRICT; 2) ESTABLISHING A TEMPORARY LAND USE DISTRICT CALLED THE FISHERIES RELATED USE DISTRICT; 3) LIMITING PERMITTED USES WITHIN THE RENAMED ESSENTIAL TRAVEL DISTRICT AND FISHERIES RELATED USE DISTRICT; 4) REQUIRING CERTAIN PERSONS TO SELF-QUARANTINE FOR FOURTEEN DAYS; 5) REQUIRING CERTAIN PERSONS TO OBTAIN A TRAVEL USE PERMIT; AND 6) REQUIRING PERSONS ENTERING THE FISHERIES RELATED USE DISTRICT TO COMPLY WITH STATE MANDATES AND CITY RULES.

BE IT ENACTED BY THE DILLINGHAM CITY COUNCIL:
Section 1. Legislative Findings:
1. The United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) has identified the COVID-19 virus as a new stain of coronavirus not previously identified in humans, causing respiratory disease that can result in serious illness or death and which poses a significant public health risk.
2. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic related to COVID-19.
3. The Covid-19 pandemic is being compared to the 1918 flu pandemic.
4. On March 11, 2020, Governor Mike Dunleavy declared a Public Health Disaster Emergency in the State of Alaska; and
5. On March 19, 2020, the Dillingham City Council approved the closure of certain public facilities through April 5, 2020 and adopted Resolution 2020-11 Declaring a Public Health Disaster Emergency per AS 26.23.140 and Dillingham Municipal Code Section 2.64.0020(B) to exist in Dillingham.
6. On March 13, 2020, President Donald Trump declared a National Emergency.
7. The CDC has recommended all persons at higher risk for COVID-19 complications avoid all non-Essential travel.
8. On March 20, 2020 the United States State Department issued a Level 4 Travel Advisor “Do Not Travel” advising all United States citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of Covid-19; and

9. On March 17, 2020, the Governor of the State of Alaska issued Covid-19 Health Mandate 004 “to prevent or slow the spread of Coronavirus Disease” which mandated a 14 day self-quarantine for persons traveling from CDC Level 3 Travel Health Notice Areas.
10. On March 24, 2020, the Curyung Tribal Council adopted Resolution 2020-11 recommending that all non-Essential travel into and out of the community of Dillingham cease by 12:01 a.m. March 26, 2020 and recommended this restriction apply to travel from other villages as well as from regional centers and Anchorage and apply to all forms of transportation including air travel, snow machine and other ground and water transportation.
11. As of the date of adoption of this Emergency Ordinance, the only access to and from Dillingham from other places in the world is by water, overland via the Lake Road and through regularly scheduled or chartered air services which use the Dillingham Airport.
12. As of the date of this Emergency Ordinance there are no known cases of Covid19 in Dillingham.
13, As of Sunday April 26 there had been 152 confirmed cases of Covid-19 in Anchorage.
14. The most effective way to prevent introduction of the Covid-19 virus to Dillingham is through prevention of persons from outside Dillingham who are infected with Covid-19 from entering Dillingham through the Dillingham Airport Terminal and Dillingham port and harbor facilities.
15. The CDC and federal and state health authorities have recommended all persons practice “social distancing” by remaining at least a six foot separation from other persons at all times and;
16. It is frequently not possible to maintain a six foot separation from other persons when using commercial air services between Dillingham and Anchorage or Dillingham and other cities in the Bristol Bay region due to the small size of the aircraft used to provide air transportation.
17. It is frequently not possible for persons using the Dillingham Small Boat Harbor to maintain a six foot separation from other persons.
18. The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America recommends that people AVOID SOCIAL GATHERINGS OF MORE THAN TEN PEOPLE.
19. Traveling by air between Dillingham and other locations in Alaska frequently involves social gatherings of more than ten people.
20. Use of the Dillingham small boat harbor during commercial fishing season frequently involves gatherings of more than ten people.
21. The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America recommends persons “AVOID DISCRETIONARY TRAVEL”.
22. The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America recommends persons LISTEN TO AND FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS OF YOUR STATE AND LOCAL AUTHORITIES.

23. On March 19 the Emergency Room medical directors of Joint-Base Elmendorf Richardson Hospital, Providence Alaska Medical Center, Alaska Regional Hospital, the Alaska Native Medical Center, Fairbanks Memorial Hospital, Bartlett Regional Hospital, the Mat-Su Regional Medical Center, the Central Peninsula Hospital, the President of the Alaska Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians and the Immediate Past President of the Alaska Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians recommended an immediate statewide ban on non-Essential travel to and from Alaska and immediate consideration of a similar ban on non-Essential travel within Alaska as a reasonable and prudent measure to reduce the impact and spread of coronavirus.
24. On March 23, 2020, the Governor of Alaska issued Health Mandate 10 requiring “all people arriving in Alaska whether resident, worker or visitor” to self-quarantine for 14 days and monitor for illness by proceeding “directly from the airport to your designated quarantine location” and to “remain in your designated quarantine location for a period of 14 days”. The stated purpose of Mandate 10 was to “protect the public health of Alaskans . . . in order to mitigate the impact of COVID-19″.
25. On March 23, 2020, the State of Alaska issued additional details on implementation of Mandate 10. Those details indicated “All workers arriving in the State must follow the 14-day self-quarantine guidance. If your business meets the definitions of critical infrastructure workers, you may put them to work immediately, provided that you have an approved Community/Workforce Protective Plan and that you enact the protective measures in your plan to safeguard the surrounding community and the remainder of your workforce from the newly arrived workers” and further indicated “All newly arrived workers will observe self-quarantine protocols in their non-work times until they have completed the required 14-day period.”
26. On March 27, 2020, the State of Alaska restricted the movement of individuals within the State of Alaska in order to prevent, slow and otherwise disrupt the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 as described in COVID-19 Health Mandate 12. 27. On April 2, 2020, the City Council approved Emergency Ordinance No. 202006(A) restricting air travel into Dillingham. Emergency Ordinance No. 2020-06(A) is due to expire on May 1, 2020.
28. Since April 2, the number of COVID-19 confirmed in Alaska has steadily increased. As of April 26, 2020, the State of Alaska had confirmed 341 cases of COVID-19. During the same time period the number of COVID-19 cases confirmed in Dillingham remained at zero confirming the effectiveness of Emergency Ordinance No. 2020-06 in preventing the spread of COVID-19 in Dillingham.
29. On April 21, 2020, the State of Alaska extended Mandate 10 until May 19, 2020 and extended Mandate 12 indefinitely.
30. On April 23, 2020 the Governor of Alaska issued Health Mandate 17 applicable to individual commercial fishing vessels that were not participating in a so-called “fleet plan”.
31. Health Mandate 17 recognizes that “some local communities, boatyards, or harbormasters may have enacted additional protective measures” and requires individual vessel owners and captains to comply with those measures.
32. It is anticipated that as many as ten thousand people from outside Dillingham will enter city boundaries via the airport or by water after May 1 and remain in the Dillingham area through the conclusion of the commercial and sport fishing seasons. These individuals will come from within Alaska, from other states on the west coast of the United States and from other countries where large numbers of confirmed cases of the COVID-19 virus have been reported.
33. As of April 26, the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 infections in Oregon, Washington and California was: California – 43,691 Oregon – 2,311 Washington – 13,663
34. Because so many of those engaged in the commercial fishing industry come from outside Alaska and are not permanent Dillingham residents the existing data as to the rate of infection, per capita testing, and rate of hospitalization within Alaska is of limited use in gaging the risk of overwhelming local medical facilities during the 2020 commercial fishing season.
35. The only health care facility in Dillingham is the Kanakanak Clinic with a current capacity of 12 beds, 1 critical care unit and no working ventilators.
36. On April 23, 2020 the Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation informed the State of Alaska that it did not have the capability of providing COVID-19 medical care to persons entering Dillingham during the commercial fishing season and stated “Without a plan of action, BBAHC resources will “most likely” be “strained and overwhelmed.
37. As of the date of this ordinance the State of Alaska has not provided any information to the City of Dillingham or its residents of plans to establish temporary medical facilities to provide COVID-19 medical care during the commercial fishing season.
38. As of the date of this ordinance, the State of Alaska has not provided any information to the City of Dillingham regarding a plan to transport persons infected with COVID-19 and needing medical care during the commercial fishing season to medical facilities elsewhere in Alaska.
39. The State of Alaska has access to sophisticated epidemiological modeling expertise including existing relationships with the University of Washington and the University of Alaska Anchorage faculty and staff.
40. As of the date of this ordinance, the State of Alaska has not provided any information to the City of Dillingham or its residents of epidemiological models predicting the number of anticipated cases of COVID-19 that will occur in Bristol Bay during the commercial fishing season or the number of cases needing hospitalization.
41. The Governor has repeatedly stated and state law enforcement personnel and the State of Alaska District Attorney’s office have repeatedly confirmed they have no intention of actually enforcing any of the Health Mandates issued by the Governor including Health Mandate 10, Health Mandate 12 and Health Mandate 17.
42. Many of the requirements of Health Mandate 17 are unlikely to be able to be practiced by the Bristol Bay commercial fishing fleet. For example, the vessels participating in the fishery are limited in length to 32 feet. Most will not have rooms with designated toilets that could be used for quarantine and isolation. Many captains are unlikely to be able to obtain some or all of the personal protective equipment referenced in Mandate 17.

43. Maintaining social distancing while in port in Dillingham during the commercial fishing season is not possible. The number of vessels using the Dillingham Small Boat Harbor exceeds the amount of space available for vessels to moor directly to floats. Vessels must tie directly to other vessels and accessing land requires captains and crew to jump from boat to boat until reaching a harbor float.
44. As of the date of this Ordinance, in every Alaskan community in which the COVID-19 virus has been confirmed to be present the initial presence of the virus resulted from an infected (and therefore contagious) person traveling into the community from another place.
45. It is a known medical fact that persons infected with the COVID-19 virus are contagious and therefore spread the virus within a community for days before exhibiting symptoms of a COVID-19 infection; and
46. The public health risk to residents of Dillingham increases with each flight or marine vessel that arrives in Dillingham.
Section 2. Finding of Emergency. The City Council hereby finds the facts set forth in Section 1 constitute an emergency.
Section 3. Authority. This ordinance is enacted pursuant to the general police powers of the City of Dillingham, the City’s authority to establish land use regulations to protect the public health and general welfare of persons in Dillingham under Section 18.08.010 of the Dillingham Municipal Code, and the City’s authority to regulate use of public facilities such as streets and highways and the Dillingham Small Boat Harbor.
Section 4. Modification of Essential Air Travel District. The boundaries of the Essential Air Travel District created by Emergency Ordinance 2020-06(A) are modified to include the entire City of Dillingham including Kanakanak Beach. The name of the district is changed to Essential Travel District.
Section 5. Establishment of Fisheries Related Use District. The Fisheries Related Use District is hereby created. The Fisheries Related Use District encompasses property whose primary use is commercial fish processing, storage of commercial fishing vessels and mooring of commercial fishing vessels. Those properties zoned as Fisheries Related Use are designated as FRU on the zoning map attached to this ordinance.
Section 6. Permitted Uses.
A. No person may enter the Essential Travel District unless that person either: 1) is traveling to Dillingham to receive non-elective medical care, or 2) is in transit and will remain within the Dillingham Airport while changing planes; or 3) lives outside city boundaries and will immediately travel from the Dillingham Airport to their place of residence via the Lake Road; or 4) lives outside city boundaries and works within the City and is traveling between their residence and their place of employment; or 5) lives outside city boundaries and obtains critical personal needs in Dillingham, traveling between their place of residence and the place of business providing critical personal needs; 6) is traveling from Dillingham; or 7) has applied for and been issued a Travel Permit by the City Manager. Persons identified in subsections 1-6 above are not required to submit a Travel Permit application.

B. No person may enter the Fisheries Related Use District unless that person either: 1) has applied for and been issued a Travel Permit by the City Manager; or 2) is a Commercial Fishing Vendor.
Section 7. Airline Use. A certificated air carrier may only use or enter the Essential Travel District to provide Essential Travel Services.
Section 8. Definitions. For the purposes of this ordinance, the words and terms defined herein shall be defined and interpreted as follows: A. “Essential Travel Services” means providing or using air transportation to or by persons permitted to travel by air to Dillingham.
B. “Essential Fisheries Services” means maintenance, operation, and supply of fish processing facilities and commercial fishing vessels including housing persons employed in fish processing and commercial fishing and transporting and launching commercial fishing vessels by persons who have been issued a Travel Use Permit.
C. “Critical Personal Needs” means a person who is:
1. a Dillingham resident who left Dillingham before March 27, 2020, is returning to Dillingham and who agrees to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. 2. traveling to Dillingham to receive required medical care. 3. traveling to Dillingham to purchase groceries or fuel. 4. traveling to the Dillingham Post Office. 5. traveling to the Dillingham branch of Wells Fargo Bank or Keybank.
D. “Commercial Fishing Vendor” means a person who has or is required to have a City of Dillingham business license, and is providing services or supplies to a commercial fishing vessel or a fish processing facility. All Commercial Fishing Vendors must sign an acknowledgement of receipt of the City of Dillingham Harbor, Dock and Commercial Fishing Vendor rules.

Section 9. Travel Use Permits. A Travel Use Permit (“Permit”) may be issued at the discretion of the City Manager provided the applicant provides sufficient information to lead the city manager to reasonably conclude: 1) the person is identified as a critical infrastructure worker in the Alaska Essential Services and Critical Workforce Infrastructure Order dated April 10, 2020 and is using property within the Essential Travel District or the Fisheries Related Use District for Essential Travel Services or Essential Fisheries Services or 2) the person is using property within the Essential Travel Services District for Critical Personal Needs or 3) the person is a Commercial Fishing Vendor. The City Manager may condition issuance of a Permit on compliance with quarantine requirements of this ordinance and City of Dillingham Harbor, Dock and Commercial Fishing Vendor Rules.
Section 10. Permit Application. Applications for a Travel Use Permit shall be submitted by electronic mail or facsimile to the Dillingham Emergency Operations Center travelpermit@dillinghamak.us , fax number 907-842-2060 using an application form prepared by the City. A decision shall be made within 48 hours after the application is submitted. Vessel owners may submit a single application to cover the vessel, captain and all crew members provided they are all identified by name on the application.

Section 11. Appeal. Any denial of a Permit shall be in writing and state the reasons therefore. Denials of a Permit by the city manager may be appealed to the Mayor by submitting a written notice of appeal. The Mayor’s decision on appeal shall be the final city action on the application. Section 12. Prohibited Use.
A. All property and structures within the Essential Travel District may only be used for purposes of providing Essential Travel Services and accessory uses for Essential Travel Services. All other uses within the Essential Travel District are prohibited.
B. All property and structures within the Fisheries Related Use District may only be used for purposes of providing Essential Fisheries Services and accessory uses for Essential Fisheries Services. All other uses within the Fisheries Related Use District are prohibited.
Section 13. Compliance with Harbor, Dock and Commercial Fishing Vendor Rules. All persons shall comply with the City of Dillingham Harbor, Dock and Commercial Fishing Vendor Rules.
Section 14. Compliance with Health Mandates. All persons shall comply with all requirements of Health Mandates 17, Health Mandate 10, Health Mandate 11 and Health Mandate 12 as in effect on April 30, 2020. This requirement shall survive any subsequent changes to or suspensions of Health Mandates 10, 11, 12 or 17.
Section 15. Limitation on Leaving the Fisheries Related Use District. Any person who holds a Travel Permit for entry into the Commercial Fisheries Use District or is required to obtain a Travel Permit for entry into the Commercial Fisheries Use District other than a Commercial Fishing Vendor shall remain within the Fisheries Related Use District except to receive nonelective medical treatment or to move directly from one place within the Commercial Fisheries Use District to another place within the Commercial Fisheries Use District.
Section 16. Face Mask Requirement. All customers, employees and visitors of businesses and organizations that are open and all persons within the Fisheries Related Use District must wear face masks covering their nose and mouth to provide additional protection from spread of COVID19. The face coverings need not be medical-grade masks or N95 respirators, but can be cloth face coverings. A cloth face covering is a material that covers the nose and mouth. It can be secured to the head with ties or straps or simply wrapped around the lower face. It can be made of a variety of materials, such as cotton, silk, or linen. A cloth face covering may be factory-made or sewn by hand or can be improvised from household items such as scarfs, T-shirts, sweatshirts or towels. A business owner or operator may refuse admission or service to any individual who fails to wear face coverings as required by this ordinance.
Section 17. Finding of Probable Cause. There is probable cause to believe that the circumstances set forth in this Ordinance mean any delay in seeking a state-ordered or judiciallyordered quarantine would pose a clear and immediate threat to public health such that a limited quarantine of a group of individuals is the least restrictive alternative and is necessary to prevent, reduce or limit the spread of the corona virus within Dillingham.
Section 18. Mandatory Quarantine. In addition to the limitations on use of property within the Essential Service District and Fisheries Related Use District set forth above, this ordinance imposes a fourteen day self-quarantine on the following identified group of individuals (“Quarantine Group”):

A. Any person required to quarantine by Health Mandate 10 or Health Mandate 17 who has not completed their quarantine immediately prior to arrival in Dillingham shall quarantine within the Fisheries Related Use District. Time spent in quarantine on a vessel or at an employer designated and supervised quarantine site immediately prior to arrival in Dillingham after initially entering Alaska shall be credited towards completion of the required quarantine.
B. Any person traveling to Dillingham for Critical Personal Needs as defined in Section 8( C)(1) shall quarantine at their place of residence.
C. Any person arriving in Dillingham from another location within Alaska who has entered the Essential Travel District or Fisheries Related Use District in violation of Section 6 of this ordinance shall quarantine at their final destination.
D. Any Dillingham resident who has entered the Fisheries Related Use District shall quarantine within the Fisheries Related Use District.
E. Any Commercial Fishing Vendor who has violated the Dillingham Harbor, Dock, and Commercial Fishing Vendor rules shall quarantine within the Fisheries Related Use District.

Section 19. Court Hearing. Any individuals in the Quarantine Group may request a court hearing to challenge the limitations imposed by this order within forty-eight hours after their arrival in Dillingham or being first subject to the quarantine provisions of this ordinance using procedures set forth in AS 18.15.385(f), (g) and (h) incorporated herein by reference. Section 20. Enforcement. Violations of this Emergency Ordinance shall be a Minor Offense. In accordance with AS 29.25.070(a), citations for violation of this ordinance may be disposed of as provided in AS 12.25.195 through 12.25.230, without a court appearance, upon payment of a onethousand dollar ($1,000) fine, plus the state surcharge required by AS 12.55.039 and 29.25.074. Fines must be paid to the court. The Alaska Court System’s Rule of Minor Offense Procedures applies. This fine may not be judicially reduced. Each day of violation shall be considered a separate offense.
Section 21. Code Provisions Superseded. This ordinance supersedes any inconsistent ordinances, rules or regulations of the City of Dillingham including, but not limited to Section 18.20.040 procedures for changing land use districts. Chapter 18.44 of the Dillingham Municipal Code shall not apply to buildings, structures, uses and lots regulated by this emergency ordinance.
Section 22. Effective Date. This ordinance is effective April 30, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. and shall continue in effect until June 29, 2020 unless extended by action of the city council. The adoption of this ordinance shall not in any manner affect any prosecution for violations of Emergency Ordinance 2020-06 committed prior to the effective date hereof.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16 replies »

  1. Steve, you are right on. What amazes me is how many buy into this crap without investigating further.

    • For a bunch of over educated, school in debt, medical people, they sure are playing stupid on this one, and trying to make this virus thing way more complicated than it has to be. Maybe it makes them feel self important, maybe they are doing all this just to confuse the public, as to extend their dollar, and spotlight time. It seems to be working.

      They know or at least they should know the PCR test is terribly flawed and inaccurate. Just do a damn antibody Test on the patient, if the patient wants one.
      A virus is a virus, stop making up new rules for viruses to persuade panic in the people. Orrrr, at least come up with a better plague next time that is believable of acting all over the chart of unexplainable characteristics.

  2. Fascinating read. They really want to kill off the commercial fishery, don’t they? House Speaker Edgmon continues to be quiet. So does Smilin’ Chuck Kopp who commfishes in BB.

    Good luck getting convictions in state court on this, guys.

    Things they forget are that virus doesn’t do well out of doors, so requirements to wear masks everywhere are idiotic at best. This is AK in the summertime and fishing is done out of doors. Falling in cold water is bad enough. Doing it with a mask on adds another level of danger. They make no effort to consider the use of far UVC light to disinfect interiors of boats, planes, buildings, etc.

    Once they shut down or damage the fishery sufficiently, they will all be in Juneau with their hands out demanding disaster aid that shouldn’t be paid.

    Solutions? 3 immediate things come to mind, all of which Craig has discussed at some level:

    – Pebble needs to proceed immediately. So does Donlin Creek
    – Fish farming in BB needs to start. Sooner would be better than later.
    – Commercial fish traps ought to be considered.

    Cheers –

    • agimarc… think about what you just wrote. You just advocated taking out the individual in our system and replacing them with big business, ( Pebble and Donlin), both of those run by big out of state, out of country corps. which is one of Craigs’ hang-ups on the Bay. Fish farming; would be another one of the big corporate entities who come from elsewhere. Fishtraps…. that will work well when run by the government I bet. Government is so cost effective and has a wonderful track record when they push their way into the private sector…..
      You are falling into exactly what the whole issue of what the coved-19 hoax is about. Big business and government control. the scariest two words in our current language. “new normal”. Just what are we going to lose?
      You sure shouldn’t end your post with “cheers.”

  3. I read this differently. Read it as working to balance economic livelihood with health. This is a tough job and few folks have experience in navigating this balance. Do keep us updated.

    • Scot,
      Exactly,we’re in uncharted waters.The last script for this play was written 100 yrs ago.
      If your working,hang on to your money bucks

      • Dave mc , once again you show your foolishness. Uncharted waters – you lie . Pandemic after pandemic, economic crisis after economic crisis, the world has endured and learned from . You say hold onto your money. Stupid is as stupid does . This pandemic has pushed the dollar to be less valuable by government flooding system with borrowed money. If you just hold onto your money bucks they become devalued as we speak. Soon ( maybe over next 100 years) there may be shortages of supply and your dollars will buy next to nothing. The smart man invests in the stock market or gold , food , supplies, rice , gardens, cheap oil ect ect . Its time to invest in survival assets,hard assets , buisness or at minimum stocks . Best to purchase something worth trading later like ammunition, masks , compost , seeds or whatever. Sure holding a little cash for inevitable purchases is fine but “ holding onto your money bucks is a fools errand” this is greatest economic opportunity weve seen in years . Dave you spread bull pucky like a good chinese media company.

      • DPR,a quick look at the$USD chart,would show you that its been rising since 2008.

      • Dave you have confused yourself with dollar exchange rate I believe. Currency Exchange . as in what American dollar currently valued against other world currencies. That has little to do with the strength/value of dollar in the Us . For purchasing needed items within our country. What’s important that you apparently missed is the dollars value has decreased almost every year based on a benchmark of what a dollar could purchase in 1900. Inflation and other issues has created a situation where you need almost 100$ In 2020 to match 1$ in 1900. Thus our money is fast becoming worth less . The problem accelerated in tge 70s especially when combined with very stagnant wages . A 20,000 $ brand new house bought in 1972 in Colorado can be sold for 200,000$+ in 2016 . ( or was ) That house was paid for via mortgage and wages from a department store job. An almost impossible thing to accomplish in 2020 . The lady who did that owned her own home from a low wage job . An impossibility in this era . Paper American Money has been destroyed by political fiscal policy. If that lady had held onto cash instead of investing in hard assets her money would have 1/10 the buying power . A huge mistake. You need to quit spreading your anti America propaganda or get some education.

      • “Paper money eventually returns to its intrinsic value — zero.”
        ~ Voltaire
        [François Marie Arouet] (1694-1778) French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher

        Purchase silver. It goes up percentage wise more than gold. The silver / gold ratio is extremely high now. Great timing for buying.

  4. The mayor, a person in and out of government service for her entire career, seems hell bent on shutting down the fishery. The order has holes everywhere. Who and how will the Dillingham Policia enforce this? Clearly written by folks who have never depended on the private sector for their livelihoods. Perhaps an unintended consequence of dropping trillions of dollars from the heavens. Line up for your free cheese Dillingham.

  5. Hmm, just read an article yesterday where hospitals are begging people to use the emergency rooms because the hospitals are desperate for business. Saw where the Comfort ship only treated 187 people and I dont believe any of those had Corona. Saw where both 6,000 bed makeshift hospitals in Wash and NY states treated zero patients and were torn down. Heard we have more ventilators now then we know what to do with. Saw where one hospital laid off 1,000 nurses. And of course heard they incentified death numbers for MONEY.. Saw where doctors in CA said the death rate was .004%, yet they got censored.
    Dillingham, you’ll be alright…

      • Bryan,
        This is why Alaska’s medical gods are all stoking the “flare up” fear across the media boards.
        This “plannedemic” has been a real cash cow to hospital systems that have been running in the red for years.
        0 new patients yesterday in Alaska but the social distancing requirements remain and businesses are requiring face masks?
        This whole thing stinks to the heavens…
        When Obama was in office we had a pandemic, no schools were closed…the economy was not interrupted and this was also a new virus at the time?
        “Before it was over, the pandemic had hit 60.8 million Americans, hospitalized 274,304, and killed 12,469, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention… 
        This was the H1N1 virus, also known as the swine flu, which emerged in April 2009 and lasted until April 2010.”

        https://www.dailysignal.com/2020/03/16/a-tale-of-2-pandemics-and-the-governments-response/

Leave a Reply to Scott Cancel reply